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Updated: Aug. 22 (13:01)

Letter From the President
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Officers & Staff Info
President
Sheena Dickerman

The President’s Constitutional Duties
• Preside over all membership and executive board meetings;
• Be a member of all local committees, except the election
committee;
• Counter-sign checks drawn against the local’s funds;
• Appoint all the local’s committees (subject to the executive
board’s approval);
• Periodically report to the membership on the “state of the local.”

In addition to his or her constitutional duties, the president, as the
chief officer in the local, regularly takes on other roles and responsibilities.
As the spokesperson of the union leadership to the rank-and-file
membership, the president should regularly communicate the union’s
vision, direction and goals. The president must also be a good listener
and should seek out the views and ideas of fellow officers as well as those
of the membership. The president’s role is like that of a team captain,
one who can focus on issues and problems and motivate people to work
together toward achieving common goals. The president is also the
union’s representative to the community. Finally, the president is the
union’s ceremonial officer on such occasions as initiation of new
members or installation of newly elected officers.




Vice-President
Rose Lacey

The Vice President’s Constitutional Duties
• Assist the president;
• Preside at meetings and perform other duties of the president
when the president is unable to do so;
• May be authorized (by the executive board) to counter-sign checks.

In many locals the vice president is the chairperson of a prominent
standing committee, such as the grievance committee. This provides a
direct link from the executive board to the work of an important committee.
The vice president can serve as a stand-in for the president in
such roles as ceremonial officer or representative to the community.




Secretary / Treasurer
Monica Rogers

The Secretary-Treasurer’s Constitutional Duties
• Receive and deposit in a bank all of the local’s money;
• Prepare and co-sign checks for the local’s expenditures;
• Submit a monthly membership report to the International Union
and see that the monthly per capita tax payment is made
(Note: In most councils, these functions are performed for the
locals by the council);
• Prepare a written monthly report of the local’s financial
transactions;
• Act as custodian of the local’s property;
• Give a surety bond through the International Union;
• Submit any required financial reports to the International Union.




Recording Secretary
Kim Daniels

The Recording Secretary’s Constitutional Duties
• Keep a record (minutes) of membership and executive board
meetings;
• Handle the local’s official correspondence.
Minutes are a brief record of what occurred at a meeting and should
include officer and committee reports, as well as motions that were
discussed and those that were passed (see Appendix B: Sample Local
Meeting Minutes). These should be written up and distributed as soon as
possible after a meeting. A copy of the monthly financial report should be
attached to the minutes and kept on file. Correspondence the executive
board considers important should be read at the membership meeting.




E-Board
Laura Maxwell

The Executive Board (E-board) shall be the governing body of the local union except when meetings of the local union are in session. All matters affecting the policies, aims and means of accomplishing the purposes of the local not specifically  provided for in the constitution  or by action of the membership at a regular or special meeting shall be decided by the E-board. The board shall meet at the call of the president or of a majority of members of the board. A report on all actions taken by the E-board shall be made to the membership at the next following meeting. A majority of the members of the E-board shall be required for a quorum.




E-Board
Adam Cline

The Executive Board (E-board) shall be the governing body of the local union except when meetings of the local union are in session. All matters affecting the policies, aims and means of accomplishing the purposes of the local not specifically  provided for in the constitution  or by action of the membership at a regular or special meeting shall be decided by the E-board. The board shall meet at the call of the president or of a majority of members of the board. A report on all actions taken by the E-board shall be made to the membership at the next following meeting. A majority of the members of the E-board shall be required for a quorum




E-Board

The Executive Board (E-board) shall be the governing body of the local union except when meetings of the local union are in session. All matters affecting the policies, aims and means of accomplishing the purposes of the local not specifically  provided for in the constitution  or by action of the membership at a regular or special meeting shall be decided by the E-board. The board shall meet at the call of the president or of a majority of members of the board. A report on all actions taken by the E-board shall be made to the membership at the next following meeting. A majority of the members of the E-board shall be required for a quorum 




E-Board
LaRee Bates

The Executive Board (E-board) shall be the governing body of the local union except when meetings of the local union are in session. All matters affecting the policies, aims and means of accomplishing the purposes of the local not specifically  provided for in the constitution  or by action of the membership at a regular or special meeting shall be decided by the E-board. The board shall meet at the call of the president or of a majority of members of the board. A report on all actions taken by the E-board shall be made to the membership at the next following meeting. A majority of the members of the E-board shall be required for a quorum 




Trustee
Sugundo Sam

The Trustees’ Constitutional Duties
• At least annually, audit the local’s finances (or oversee an audit) and
report the audit’s results to the membership.


Trustees may arrange for the annual audit to be conducted by a
certified public accountant (CPA). Trustees conducting their own audit
should consult the Trustees Audit Guide on pages 51-59 of the AFSCME
Financial Standards Code. Once completed, copies of the audit should
be reviewed by the executive board and discussed at the membership
meeting. A copy should be sent to the International secretary-treasurer.
Because their sole function is to guarantee the members’ “right to a full
and clear accounting of all union funds,” the trustees must be independent
and are not voting members of the executive board.




Trustee
Mona Farmer

The Trustees’ Constitutional Duties
• At least annually, audit the local’s finances (or oversee an audit) and
report the audit’s results to the membership.


Trustees may arrange for the annual audit to be conducted by a
certified public accountant (CPA). Trustees conducting their own audit
should consult the Trustees Audit Guide on pages 51-59 of the AFSCME
Financial Standards Code. Once completed, copies of the audit should
be reviewed by the executive board and discussed at the membership
meeting. A copy should be sent to the International secretary-treasurer.
Because their sole function is to guarantee the members’ “right to a full
and clear accounting of all union funds,” the trustees must be independent
and are not voting members of the executive board.




Trustee
Troy Kemper

The Trustees’ Constitutional Duties
• At least annually, audit the local’s finances (or oversee an audit) and
report the audit’s results to the membership.


Trustees may arrange for the annual audit to be conducted by a
certified public accountant (CPA). Trustees conducting their own audit
should consult the Trustees Audit Guide on pages 51-59 of the AFSCME
Financial Standards Code. Once completed, copies of the audit should
be reviewed by the executive board and discussed at the membership
meeting. A copy should be sent to the International secretary-treasurer.
Because their sole function is to guarantee the members’ “right to a full
and clear accounting of all union funds,” the trustees must be independent
and are not voting members of the executive board.




Stewards

Open to all members, training provided, your current stewards:

Jim Harry

Sheena Dickerman

Jennifer Cable

Laura Maxwell

THE ROLES OF THE STEWARD


AFSCME members bring different skills, abilities, strengths and
experiences to the job of union steward. Some stewards are terrific
organizers while others are great at motivating people. Some enjoy
representing members in the grievance procedure and others eagerly
tackle on-the-job issues by developing new tactics and strategies. With
their energy, enthusiasm and commitment, AFSCME stewards play a
key role in creating a vigorous local union.

The Steward as Leader
Leadership can be defined as the ability to motivate a group of people
to act in pursuit of its common interests and goals.
AFSCME members look to the steward as a leader in the workplace.
They turn to the steward when they are seeking information or when
they need some help in solving a problem. To be a leader, the steward
must understand the diversity of the union’s membership — cultural,
racial, gender, sexual orientation, age differences — and promote unity
to put a stop to management attempts to divide workers.
As a steward, you must have credibility (defined simply as being
“worthy of belief or trust”) with union members, co-workers, and the
managers and supervisors with whom you attempt to resolve workplace
issues and problems. Usually, credibility isn’t easily granted — it must
be earned over time.

You must be able to listen to the problems, concerns and issues of
members and co-workers. By identifying workplace problems, stewards
can engage members in developing solutions. Listening is a skill that
must be developed and practiced.

Stewards must be able to motivate members to take action on
workplace concerns and problems. Stewards who try to “do it all”
become overburdened, overwhelmed and stressed out. Stewards who do
it all are not involving other members in the union. High member participation
is a sign of a strong union.

http://www.afscme.org/members/education-for-action/document/AFSCME-Steward-Handbook-1.pdf





 
 
AFSCME Local 2909
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